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Periodic solutions for prescribed mean curvature Rayleigh equation with a deviating argument

Advances in Difference Equations20132013:88

https://doi.org/10.1186/1687-1847-2013-88

  • Received: 14 December 2012
  • Accepted: 19 March 2013
  • Published:

Abstract

By using Mawhin’s continuation theorem in the coincidence degree theory, some criteria for guaranteeing the existence of periodic solutions for prescribed mean curvature Rayleigh equation with a deviating argument are provided.

Keywords

  • prescribed mean curvature Rayleigh equation
  • periodic solutions
  • Leray-Schauder degree

1 Introduction

Consider the prescribed mean curvature Rayleigh equation
( x 1 + x 2 ) + f ( t , x ( t ) ) + g ( t , x ( t τ ( t ) ) ) = e ( t ) ,
(1.1)

where τ , e C ( R , R ) are T-periodic, and f , g C ( R × R , R ) are T-periodic in the first argument, T > 0 is a constant.

In recent years, there are many results on the existence of periodic solutions for various types of delay differential equation with deviating arguments, especially for the Liénard equation and Rayleigh equation (see [111]). Now as the prescribed mean curvature ( x ( t ) 1 + x 2 ( t ) ) of a function x ( t ) frequently appears in different geometry and physics (see [1214]), it is interesting to try to consider the existence of periodic solutions of prescribed mean curvature equations. However, to our best knowledge, the studies of delay equations with prescribed mean curvature is relatively infrequent. The main difficulty lies in the nonlinear term ( x ( t ) 1 + x 2 ( t ) ) , the existence of which obstructs the usual method of finding a priori bounds for delay Liénard or Rayleigh equations from working. In [15], Feng discussed a delay prescribed mean curvature Liénard equation of the form
( x 1 + x 2 ) + f ( x ( t ) ) x ( t ) + g ( t , x ( t τ ( t ) ) ) = e ( t ) ,
(1.2)

estimated a priori bounds by eliminating the nonlinear term ( x ( t ) 1 + x 2 ( t ) ) , and established sufficient conditions on the existence of periodic solutions for (1.2) by using Mawhin’s continuation theorem.

The conditions imposed on f ( x ) and g ( t , x ) in [15] were such as:

(C1) There exists γ > 0 satisfies | f ( x ) | γ .

(C2) There exists l > 0 such that | g ( t , x 1 ) g ( t , x 2 ) | l | x 1 x 2 | , t R , x 1 , x 2 R .

It is not difficult to see that the condition (C1) is strong. It is natural to relax the conditions (C1) and (C2). Our purpose is studying the more general equation (1.1) under the more weaker conditions.

The rest of the paper is organized as follows. In Section 2, we shall state and prove some basic lemmas. In Section 3, we shall prove the main result. An example will be given to show the applications of our main result in the final section.

2 Preliminaries

In this section, we first recall Mawhin’s continuation theorem, which our study is based upon.

Let X and Y be real Banach spaces and L : X Dom L Y be a linear operator. L is said to be a Fredholm operator with index zero provided that
  1. (i)

    ImL is closed subset of Y,

     
  2. (ii)

    dim ker L = codim Im L < + .

     

Set X = ker L X 1 , Y = Im L Y 1 . Let P : X ker L and Q : Y Y 1 be the nature projections. It is easy to see that ker L ( Dom L X 1 ) = 0 . Thus, the restriction L p : = L | Dom L X 1 is invertible. We denote by k the inverse of L p .

Let Ω be a open bounded subset of X with Dom L Ω ϕ . A map N : Ω ¯ Y is said to be L-compact in Ω ¯ if Q N : Ω ¯ Y and k ( I Q ) N : Ω ¯ X are compact.

The following lemma due to Mawhin [16] is fundamental to prove our main result.

Lemma 2.1 Let L be a Fredholm operator of index zero and Let N be L-compact on Ω ¯ . If the following conditions hold:

(h1) L x λ N x , ( x , λ ) [ ( D ( L ) Ker L ) Ω ] × ( 0 , 1 ) ;

(h2) N x Im L , x Ker L Ω ;

(h3) deg ( J Q N | Ker L , Ω Ker L , 0 ) 0 .

Then L x = N x has at least one solution in D ( L ) Ω ¯ .

The following lemmas is useful in the proof of our main result.

Lemma 2.2 ([17])

Let s C ( R , R ) with s ( t ) [ 0 , T ] , t R . Suppose p ( 1 , + ) , α = max t [ 0 , T ] s ( t ) and u C 1 ( R , R ) with u ( t + ω ) = u ( t ) . Then
0 T | u ( t ) u ( t s ( t ) ) | p d t α p 0 T | u ( t ) | p d t .

Lemma 2.3 ([18])

If x C T 1 ( R , R ) and 0 T x ( t ) d t = 0 , then
0 T | x ( t ) | 2 d t ( T 2 / 4 π 2 ) 0 T | x ( t ) | 2 d t
(Wirtinger inequality) and
| x | 2 ( T / 12 ) 0 T | x ( t ) | 2 d t

(Sobolev inequality).

Lemma 2.4 ([18])

Suppose x ( t ) C 1 [ 0 , T ] , and x ( 0 ) = x ( T ) = 0 . Then
0 T | x ( t ) | 2 d t T 2 π 2 0 T | x ( t ) | 2 d t .
Lemma 2.5 Assume that x ( t ) C 1 [ 0 , T ] , and x ( 0 ) = x ( T ) = 0 . Then
| x ( t ) | 1 2 T ( 0 T | x ( t ) | 2 d t ) 2 , t [ 0 , T ] .

Proof

It is easy to see that
| x ( t ) | = | x ( 0 ) + 0 t x ( s ) d s | 0 t | x ( s ) | d s , t [ 0 , T ] ,
and
| x ( t ) | = | x ( T ) t T x ( s ) d s | t T | x ( s ) | d s , t [ 0 , T ] .
Combining the above inequalities and using Hölder’s inequality,
| x ( t ) | 1 2 0 T | x ( s ) | d s 1 2 T ( 0 T | x ( t ) | 2 d t ) 2 , t [ 0 , T ] .

The proof is completed. □

In order to apply Mawhin’s continuation theorem to study the existence of T-periodic solution of Equation (1.1), we rewrite (1.1) as
{ x ( t ) = y ( t ) 1 y 2 ( t ) , y ( t ) = f ( t , y ( t ) 1 y 2 ( t ) ) g ( t , x ( t τ ( t ) ) ) + e ( t ) .
(2.1)

Obviously, if z ( t ) = ( x ( t ) , y ( t ) ) is a T-periodic solution of (2.1), then x ( t ) must be a T-periodic solution of (1.1). Hence, the problem of finding a T-periodic solution of (1.1) reduces to finding one of (2.1).

Now, we set
X = Y = { z : z ( t ) = ( x ( t ) , y ( t ) ) C ( R 1 , R 2 ) , z ( t ) = z ( t + T ) } ,
with the norm z = max { x , y } , where
x = max t [ 0 , T ] | x ( t ) | , y = max t [ 0 , T ] | y ( t ) | .
Clearly, X and Y are Banach spaces. Meanwhile, let
L : X Dom L Y , L z = z = ( x ( t ) , y ( t ) ) ,
where
Dom L = { z : z = ( x ( t ) , y ( t ) ) C 1 ( R , R 2 ) , z ( t ) = z ( t + T ) } .
Define a nonlinear operator N : X Y by
N z = ( y ( t ) 1 y 2 ( t ) f ( t , y ( t ) 1 y 2 ( t ) ) g ( t , x 1 ( t τ ( t ) ) ) + e ( t ) ) .

Then the problem (2.1) can be written to L z = N z .

It is easy to see that ker L = R 2 and Im L = { u Y : 0 T u ( s ) d s = 0 } . So, L is a Fredholm operator with index zero.

Let P : X ker L and Q : Y Im Q be defined by
P z = 1 T 0 T z ( s ) d s , Q u = 1 T 0 T u ( s ) d s ,
and denote by k the inverse of L | ker P Dom L . Then ker L = Im Q = R 2 and
k u ( t ) = 0 T G ( t , s ) u ( s ) d s ,
(2.2)
where
G ( t , s ) = { s T , 0 s < t T , s T T , 0 t s T .

It follows from (2.2) that N is L-compact on Ω ¯ , where Ω is an open, bounded subset of X.

3 Main results

In this section, we will state and prove our main results.

We first give the following assumptions:

(H1) f ( t , 0 ) = 0 , and x f ( t , x ) 0 (or x f ( t , x ) 0 ), t R .

(H2) x g ( t , x ) 0 (or x g ( t , x ) 0 ), t R , and | g ( t , x ) | > e for | x | > d .

(H3) There exists r 1 , r 2 , r 3 > 0 such that
r 1 lim inf | x | | f ( t , x ) | | x | lim sup | x | | f ( t , x ) | | x | r 2 , uniformly in  t R ,
and
lim sup | x | | g ( t , x ) | | x | r 3 , uniformly in  t R .

(H4) There exists an integer m such that 0 τ ( t ) m T T , and α : = τ ( t ) m T T .

Theorem 3.1 Assume (H1)-(H4) hold. Then Equation (1.1) has at least one T-periodic solution provided
r 3 r 1 < max { 2 T , 1 α + T π } .
(3.1)

Proof

Consider the operator equation
L z = λ N z , λ ( 0 , 1 ) .
(3.2)
Let Ω 1 = { z X : L z = λ N z , λ ( 0 , 1 ) } . If z ( t ) = ( x ( t ) , y ( t ) ) Ω 1 , we have
{ x ( t ) = λ y ( t ) 1 y 2 ( t ) , y ( t ) = λ f ( t , y ( t ) 1 y 2 ( t ) ) λ g ( t , x ( t τ ( t ) ) ) + λ e ( t ) ,
(3.3)
It follows from the first equation of (3.3) that
y ( t ) = 1 λ x ( t ) 1 + 1 λ 2 x 2 ( t ) .
Then (3.3) can be written to
( 1 λ x ( t ) 1 + 1 λ 2 x 2 ( t ) ) = λ f ( t , 1 λ x ( t ) ) λ g ( t , x ( t τ ( t ) ) ) + λ e ( t ) .
(3.4)
Integrating the first equation of (3.3) from 0 to T, we have
0 T y ( t ) 1 y 2 ( t ) d t = 0 .
Then there exist t 1 , t 2 [ 0 , T ] , such that
y ( t 1 ) 0 , y ( t 2 ) 0 .
Assume that t 3 , t 4 [ 0 , T ] are the maximum and minimum points, respectively. Then
y ( t 3 ) 0 , y ( t 3 ) = 0 ,
(3.5)
and
y ( t 4 ) 0 , y ( t 4 ) = 0 .
(3.6)
It follows from the second equation of (3.3) that
0 = y ( t 3 ) = λ f ( t 3 , y ( t 3 ) 1 y 2 ( t 3 ) ) λ g ( t 3 , x ( t 3 τ ( t 3 ) ) ) + λ e ( t 3 ) .
From (H1) and (H2), without loss of generality, we can assume that x f ( t , x ) 0 and x g ( t , x ) 0 , x R . Then
g ( t 3 , x ( t 3 τ ( t 3 ) ) ) e ( t 3 ) e .
If x ( t 3 τ ( t 3 ) ) > d , then g ( t 3 , x ( t 3 τ ( t 3 ) ) ) > e , which is a contradiction. It follows that
x ( t 3 τ ( t 3 ) ) d .
(3.7)
Similarly, from (3.6), we have
x ( t 4 τ ( t 4 ) ) d .
(3.8)
Combining the above, we know that there exists a point ξ [ 0 , T ] such that
| x ( ξ τ ( ξ ) ) | d .
Note that there exist k Z and t [ 0 , T ] such that ξ τ ( ξ ) = k T + t . Then we get
| x ( t ) | d .
By Lemma 2.4, we obtain
| x ( t ) | | x ( t ) | + | x ( t ) x ( t ) | | x ( t ) | + 1 2 T ( t T + T | x ( t ) | 2 d t ) 1 2 = d + 1 2 T x 2 .
Hence,
x d + 1 2 T x 2 .
(3.9)
Meanwhile, by Lemma 2.3, we have
x 2 = ( 0 T | x ( t ) | 2 d t ) 1 2 = ( 0 T | x ( t + t ) | 2 d t ) 1 2 = ( 0 T | x ( t + t ) x ( t ) + x ( t ) | 2 d t ) 1 2 ( 0 T ( | x ( t + t ) x ( t ) | + d ) 2 d t ) 1 2 = ( 0 T ( | x ( t + t ) x ( t ) | 2 + 2 d | x ( t + t ) x ( t ) | + d 2 ) d t ) 1 2 ( T 2 π 2 0 T | x ( t ) | 2 d t + 2 d T T π ( 0 T | x ( t ) | 2 d t ) 1 2 + d 2 T ) 1 2 = T π x 2 + d T .
(3.10)
From (3.1), we have T 2 r 3 < r 1 , or r 3 ( α + T π ) < r 1 . Then there exists ε > 0 such that
T 2 ( r 3 + ε ) < r 1 ε ,
(3.11)
or
( r 3 + ε ) ( α + T π ) < ( r 1 ε ) .
(3.12)
For such a ε > 0 , it follows from (H3), there exist h 1 , h 2 0 such that
( r 1 ε ) | x | h 1 | f ( t , x ) | ( r 2 + ε ) | x | + h 1 , t , x R ,
(3.13)
and
| g ( t , x ) | ( r 3 + ε ) | x | + h 2 , t , x R .
(3.14)
Multiplying x ( t ) and (3.4) and integrating from 0 to T, we get
λ 0 T f ( t , 1 λ x ( t ) ) x ( t ) d t + λ 0 T g ( t , x ( t τ ( t ) ) ) x ( t ) d t = λ 0 T e ( t ) x ( t ) d t .
(3.15)
It follows from (H1) and (3.13) that
| λ 0 T f ( t , 1 λ x ( t ) ) x ( t ) d t | = λ 0 T | f ( t , 1 λ x ( t ) ) x ( t ) | d t ( r 1 ε ) 0 T | x ( t ) | 2 d t λ 0 T h 1 | x ( t ) | d t .
(3.16)
Substituting (3.16) into (3.15) and from (3.14), we have
(3.17)
Case 1. (3.11) holds. It follows from (3.17) and Hölder inequality that
( r 1 ε ) x 2 2 ( r 3 + ε ) x T x 2 + ( e + h 1 + h 2 ) T x 2 ( r 3 + ε ) ( 1 2 T x 2 + d ) T x 2 + ( e + h 1 + h 2 ) T x 2 = ( r 3 + ε ) T 2 x 2 2 + ( ( r 3 + ε ) d + e + h 1 + h 2 ) T x 2 .
From (3.9) and (3.11), we obtain that there exists a positive constant M 1 such that
x 2 M 1 , and x M 1 .
Case 2. (3.12) holds. It follows from (3.17), Lemma 2.2 and Hölder inequality that
( r 1 ε ) x 2 2 ( r 3 + ε ) 0 T | x ( t ) x ( t τ ( t ) ) | | x ( t ) | d t + ( r 3 + ε ) 0 T | x ( t ) | | x ( t ) | d t + ( e + h 1 + h 2 ) 0 T | x ( t ) | d t ( r 3 + ε ) ( 0 T | x ( t ) x ( t τ ( t ) ) | 2 d t ) 1 2 ( 0 T | x ( t ) | 2 d t ) 1 2 + ( r 3 + ε ) ( 0 T | x ( t ) | 2 d t ) 1 2 ( 0 T | x ( t ) | 2 d t ) 1 2 + ( e + h 1 + h 2 ) 0 T | x ( t ) | d t ( r 3 + ε ) ( α 2 0 T | x ( t ) | 2 d t ) 1 2 ( 0 T | x ( t ) | 2 d t ) 1 2 + ( r 3 + ε ) ( T π x 2 + d T ) x 2 + ( e + h 1 + h 2 ) T x 2 = ( r 3 + ε ) ( α + T π ) x 2 2 + ( ( r 3 + ε ) d + e + h 1 + h 2 ) T x 2 .
From (3.9) and (3.12), we know there exists a positive constant M 2 such that
x 2 M 2 , and x M 2 .
Take R 1 = max { M 1 , M 2 } . Then, if (3.1) holds, we have
x 2 R 1 , and x R 1 .
By the first equation of (3.3), we have
0 T y ( t ) 1 y 2 ( t ) d t = 0 .
Then there exists η [ 0 , T ] such that y ( η ) = 0 . It implies that
y ( t ) = η t y ( s ) d s + y ( η ) = η t y ( s ) d s ,
and
y 0 T | y ( s ) | d s .
From the second equation of (3.3), we get
0 T | y ( s ) | d s λ 0 T | f ( t , 1 λ x ( t ) ) | d t + λ 0 T | g ( t , x ( t τ ( t ) ) ) | d t + λ 0 T | e ( t ) | d t .
Noticing that x R 1 , we have there exists k > 0 , such that
| g ( t , x ( t τ ( t ) ) ) | k , t [ 0 , T ] .
Then, from (3.13), we have
0 T | y ( t ) | d t ( r 2 + ε ) 0 T | x ( t ) | d t + λ 0 T h 1 d t + λ 0 T k d t + λ 0 T | e ( t ) | d t ( r 2 + ε ) T x 2 + ( h 1 + k + e ) T ( r 2 + ε ) T R 1 + ( h 1 + k + e ) T : = R 2 .

Hence, y R 2 .

Let Ω 2 = { z ker L : N z Im L } . If z Ω 2 , then z ker L and Q N z = 0 . Obviously,
| x ( t ) | R 1 , y ( t ) = 0 R 2 .
Set
Ω = { z = ( x , y ) X : x < R 1 + 1 , y < R 2 + 1 } ,

then (1) and (2) of Lemma 2.1 are satisfied.

Next, we claim that (3) of Lemma 2.1 is also satisfied. For this, we define the isomorphism J : Im Q ker L by
J ( x , y ) = ( y , x ) ,

and let H ( ν , μ ) = μ ν + ( 1 μ ) J Q N ν , ( ν , μ ) Ω × [ 0 , T ] .

By simple calculations, we obtain, for ( z , μ ) ( Ω ker L ) × [ 0 , 1 ] ,
z H ( z , μ ) = μ ( x 2 + y 2 ) + 1 μ T x 0 T ( g ( t , x ( t τ ( t ) ) ) e ( t ) ) d t .

Obviously, it follows from (H2) that z H ( z , μ ) > 0 .

Then
deg ( J Q N , Ω ker L , 0 ) = deg ( H ( z , 0 ) , Ω ker L , 0 ) = deg ( H ( z , 1 ) , Ω ker L , 0 ) = deg ( I , Ω ker L , 0 ) 0 ,

which implies condition (3) of Lemma 2.1 is also satisfied.

Thus L z = N z has a solution z = ( x ( t ) , y ( t ) ) , i.e., Equation (1.1) has a T-periodic solution x ( t ) with x R 1 . This completes the proof. □

Remark 3.1 If r 3 r 1 < 2 T , the condition (H4) can be not assumed, i.e., it follows only from (H1)-(H3) that Equation (1.1) has a T-periodic solution.

4 An example

In this section, as applications for Theorem 3.1, we list the following example.

Example 4.1

Consider prescribed mean curvature Rayleigh equation with a deviating argument
( x 1 + x 2 ) + f ( t , x ( t ) ) + g ( t , x ( t 1 2 cos 2 t ) ) = cos t ,
(4.1)

where f ( t , x ) = ( 2 + 1 2 sin 2 t ) x 3 1 + x 4 , g ( t , x ) = 1 3 ( 1 + sin 4 t ) x 5 1 + x 8 .

Let T = 2 π . Clearly, r 1 = 2 , r 2 = 3 2 , r 3 = 2 3 , α = 1 2 , and
r 3 r 1 = 1 3 < max { 2 2 π , 1 1 2 + 2 π π } = 2 5 .

From Theorem 3.1, Equation (4.1) has at least one T-periodic solution.

Remark 4.1 If f ( t , x ) = ( 2 + 1 2 sin 2 t ) x , g ( t , x ) = 1 3 ( 1 + sin 4 t ) x , Equation (4.1) is a prescribed mean curvature Liénard equation. By using Theorem 3.1, it has at least one 2π-periodic solution, which cannot be obtained by [15]. This implies that the results of this paper are essentially new.

Declarations

Acknowledgements

Research supported by National Science foundation of China, No. 10771145 and the Beijing Natural Science Foundation (Existence and multiplicity of periodic solutions in nonlinear oscillations), No. 1112006.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
College of Science, Jiujiang University, Jiujiang, 332005, China
(2)
School of Mathematical Sciences, Capital Normal University, Beijing, 100048, China

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© Li et al.; licensee Springer. 2013

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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